Public Homepage
Resident Login
 
Announcements
Clubs, Groups & Organizations
eForms
Events Calendar
Facilities
Governing Documents
GW Voice
Homes for Rent
Homes for Sale
Hot Links
Map
Model Floor Plans
Home » Announcements » Recent eMail Bulletins » Whittingham HOA eMail Bulletin

Announcements

Whittingham HOA eMail Bulletin

7/29/2019

Did you know our Shuffleboard Courts have been revitalized?
Grab your friends and get ready for some fun!

                       

Common Shuffleboard Game Rules

Have you ever wondered how to play shuffleboard? Here are the most common shuffleboard rules that generally apply to most games. The rules usually require that you alternately take turns sliding, by hand, all 4 of your weights against the ones from your opponent. Try to make it to the highest scoring area on the shuffleboard without falling off the end of the board into the alley. In order to earn points your weights need to be the farthest down the board. Some of the strategy and fun really comes into play when you knock off your opponents' weights, outdistance them or use your weights to protect your other highest scoring weights.

Usually the most common games are played either to 15 or 21 points. The sections below cover the shuffleboard game rules for the most famous (and fun) shuffleboard games. We hope you find these game rules helpful for enjoyment of your McClure Shuffleboard table.

Knock Off Shuffleboard Rules:

Knock Off shuffleboard is one of the simplest and most common ways to play the game. However, just because the rules are simple to remember does not mean the game is easy to play. Any game of shuffleboard can be improved with patience and strategy, and this one is no different.

Basic Knock Off Gameplay

Knock Off can be played one-on-one or with two teams of two people. If playing with two teams, one of each set of partners will play at opposite ends of the board and remain there for the duration of the game. Games are played until one team scores 15-points and is deemed the winner. If you want to keep the competition going, some will play the game to a score of 21 points.

In tournament play, the director will designate whether you are playing 'Short Foul Line” or “Long Foul Line.” Most tournaments play with 'Short Foul Line' rules, which means any puck past the foul line closest to the shooter is considered in-play. In 'Long Foul Line' Knock Off game, the pucks are considered in-play when they are past the foul line on the opposite end of the board. It’s important to note that most home games are played on 14-foot tables or shorter that only have one foul line in the center of the table so you would play a single foul line rule which would put pucks in play only if they are past the center line or only foul line on a shorter table.

How To Throw Shuffleboard Pucks In Knock Off

Play may start from either end of the board, but the shooting order and weight color are decided by a coin toss. The winner of the flip may elect to choose the color of the shuffleboard puck or the hammer. Named for the person who has the last shot of the round, the hammer is considered an advantage since you have the final opportunity to knock off an opponent’s puck. The player’s alternate shots until the round is over and all four weights have been thrown across the shuffleboard table.

The team or player who scored points on the previous round must shoot first on the next round. If no points are scored on the preceding round (I.E.: All weights are knocked off) than the hammer changes hands. Play continues in this manner until one team reaches the designated points usually 15 points.

How To Score In Knock Off

In each round of Knock Off, only one player scores points. The team who has thrown their puck closest to the end of the board scores all the points in that round. Only the pucks that are ahead of your opponent's deepest weight are added together for the score for that round. A weight scores one-point if it is located between the designated foul line and the two-point line. Weights completely across the two or three line likewise count for the allotted number of points for that section of the table.

To judge if a weight is completely over the line it should be viewed from above (i.e., look down over the top of the weight). The entire weight must be over the line for it to count as the next higher point value. If any portion of the weight is hanging over the end of the board in the three-point section, it’s called a “hanger' and counts as four-points. If you’re having trouble calling a hanger, check by holding a weight flat to the edge of the board and dragging it along the back end of the board. If it hits the hanger the puck then it is worth the entire four-points.

 

 Horse Collar Table Shuffleboard Rules:

Need a high scoring affair? Horse Collar shuffleboard is played one-on-one or with teams, and the winner must score 51 points. With a fun betting element for those who can’t score and huge shots worth 26 points, Horse Collar is a game that everyone will be wanting to play.

Horse Collar Game Play

Horse Collar shuffleboard games are played one-on-one or with two or more teams of two players. In this game, team partners shoot from the same end of the board, while in a one-on-one match they shoot opposite of each other. Each player or team uses one set of colored pucks (four for teams of two, eight for one-on-one) to make their attempts at scoring. Depending on the number of players, teams may need to alternate ends as the frames change.

Objective

Frames continue on until one player or team has scored the magic number of 51 points. This score doesn’t necessarily win you the game, as the winner must have the last shot in their hand (“the hammer”) in order to claim victory for him or herself. Every player or team gets to finish each frame and the highest score is the winner. During gameplay, no players are allowed to leave their position to check a weight to see what their partner or opponent has thrown.

How To Throw Shuffleboard Pucks In Horse Collar

With the object being to score the most points, the concept of throwing shuffleboard pucks in Horse Collar is somewhat simple. It’s just getting your pucks to go where you want that is complicated. Before a player or team can score any points at all, at least one puck must be a three-pointer or more. From there the scoring breaks down slightly different that the typical shuffleboard game.

How To Keep Score In Horse Collar

Any pucks past the designated foul line are eligible to be counted when scoring in Horse Collar as long as there is one puck in the three-point section. The traditional scoring for most shuffleboards game is in play when it comes to pucks that land within the one-point, two-point and three-point section. However, “hangers,” or pucks that hang over the edge of the board in three-point territory, are worth more points. In the game of Horse Collar Hanging pucks in the middle of the board are worth 13 points, while pucks residing on the corners are worth 26. As mentioned previously, once a player has scored 51 points, and only once they have

 

 How To Play Shuffleboard Crazy Eight Rules:


As far as physically throwing the pucks and keeping score, Crazy Eight presents a version of shuffleboard that is pretty similar to many of the classic games people play. However, Crazy Eight is a fun and challenging version of shuffleboard due to the way that points are actually scored.

Basic Crazy Eight Gameplay

Crazy Eight is a single game played with 2 or more players and is played in frames allowing all players to have an equal chance. Players alternate ends of the board between frames, each player using all eight pucks (red & blue). The game is played until one player scores some agreed upon number of points ( 3 points, 15 points, 30 points, etc.). Frames are continued until a winner is determined. Being the first to score the agreed upon points does not necessarily make that player the winner. Every player gets to finish that frame and the highest score that is equal to or greater than the agreed upon game point ( 3 points, 15 points, 30 points, etc.) is declared the winner.

If the player that scores equal to or greater than the agreed minimum required points has the hammer (the last player to play), then he/she is declared the winner. If the last player ties with a prior player, then another round must be played to determine the winner.

How To Play Crazy Eight

Take 4 pucks [of same color], group them together, and throw them with one hand. If all 4 pucks do not pass the long foul line and stay on the board, no points are scored for that round [and player gets a 'Hickey' if your tournament includes a 'Hickey Jar'], and next player is up on the opposite end of the board for their turn.

If all 4 weights of the same color group did pass the long foul line and stay on the board, then player shoots the remaining 4 weights [of opposite color] one at a time and attempts to knock off the 1st 4 weights and keep at least one of the last four weights of the opposite color on the board to score points (this is great practice for knock off, making combination shots to remove more than one of the 4 weights with one shot, and to be able to either stick a final shot or lag with the weights you have left after you've knocked off all 4 weights of the original color group).

If all of the first color group weights are knocked off and you still have at least one of the second color on the board and past the long foul line, this is your score; otherwise, no point is scored [and player gets a 'Hickey' if your tournament includes a 'Hickey Jar']. In either case, the next player is up on the opposite end of the board for their turn.

Before a Player Can Score

  • The first 4 pucks (same color) must be thrown simultaneously with one hand and all 4 pucks must stay on the board and be past the foul line.
  • If all 4 pucks do not stay on the board, then the player gets no points for that round and the next player is up to play.
  • If all 4 pucks do stay on the board past the foul line, then the player must shoot all 4 pucks (in four shots) of the opposite color and must knock off those first four pucks thrown past the foul line before any points can be scored for that frame.
  • After all 4 original pucks are knocked off, the remaining pucks left on the table are scored.

For instance, if a player does not get all four of their first 4 pucks past the foul line, no points are scored; if a player does get all 4 pucks past the foul line on the first throw, but does not knock them off and keeps at least one of the final 4 pucks on the board, no points are scored; if a player gets all 4 first pucks past the foul line, knocks them all off and has at least one of the final 4 pucks left on the board, points are added and count.

Crazy Eight Scoring Rules

Scoring (e.g., 1-point, 2-points, 3-points, or 4-points) is similar to 'knock off' with the exceptions noted above where first 4 weights of the same color must remain on the board and past the long foul line, and then they must all be knocked off with the remaining 4 weights of the opposite color while keeping one or more of these weights on the board.

A puck scores 1-point if it is located between the long foul line and the '2' line. Pucks completely across the '2' line count 2-points; pucks across the '3' line count 3-points, a weight hanging over the end of the board (a.k.a. hanger) counts 4-points, etc. To judge if a pucks is completely over a line it should be viewed from above (i.e., look down over the top of the puck, positioning your nose approximately to the center of the weight --do not lean over too far or you get an inaccurate view-- the entire puck must be over the line for it to count as the next higher point value--you should be able to see some wood between the line and the puck for it to count as the next higher point.)

If any portion of the puck is hanging over the end of the board (not the side) it is called a 'hanger' and counts 4-points. Close calls can be checked by holding a puck so the top of a puck is along the back end of the board. The puck is then slid along the back end of the board. If it hits the hanger puck it is worth 4-points.

 




This site is provided by TOPS Software